The self-assembling computer chips of the future

The transistors that power the phone in your pocket are unimaginably small: you can fit more than 3,000 of them across the width of a human hair.


About the talk

The transistors that power the phone in your pocket are unimaginably small: you can fit more than 3,000 of them across the width of a human hair. But to keep up with innovations in fields like facial recognition and augmented reality, we need to pack even more computing power into our computer chips - and we're running out of space. In this forward-thinking talk, technology developer Karl Skjonnemand introduces a radically new kind of way to create chips. "This could be the dawn of a new era of molecular manufacturing," Skjonnemand says.

About the speaker

Karl Skjonnemand · Technology developer

Karl Skjonnemand has launched several new products and built new business in different industries with novel materials. He currently leads a diverse group of R&D teams working on innovative materials for semiconductor applications.

Skjonnemand grew up overseas then returned home to the UK where he studied physics followed by a PhD in molecular electronics. Since 1999, he's worked in industrial research and development in Taiwan, Japan, USA and the UK. He's a strong believer that thought diversity within R&D creates a powerhouse for innovation.

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