Matibabu: Presenting Uganda's first Startup at CES

Overview

Have you ever dreamed of showcasing your startup at the biggest trade fair for consumer technologies, the CES? – For our former startup Matibabu, from the second round of our Accelerator program in Darmstadt, this dream came true! Find out more about this exciting new #BigBangMoment below.

Publish Date

11 APR 2017

Have you ever dreamed of showcasing your startup at the biggest trade fair for consumer technologies, the CES? – For our former startup Matibabu, from the second round of our Accelerator program in Darmstadt, this dream came true! Find out more about this exciting new #BigBangMoment below.

The CES 2017 took place in the Sands Expo Center in Las Vegas, Nevada, with more than 3800 companies showcasing their products in consumer technology hardware, content, technology delivery systems and more. As part of TechCrunch’s Eureka Park, the co-founders of Matibabu Brian Gitta and Josiah Kavuma presented the current prototype to investors and industry delegates from big technology companies on the 6th of January in 2017. But how is this a #BigBangMoment? Matibabu was the first startup from Uganda to ever present at the CES!

In addition to showcasing their malaria detection machine devices, the team also took part in the TechCrunch Startup Hardware Battlefield at CES. The Startup Battlefield brings the world’s best early stage startups together to compete for the coveted Metal Man trophy and a cash prize of $ 50,000. The teams get the attention of media representatives and investors. The jury included TechCrunch editors, as well as top Venture Capitalists. Even though the Matibabu team didn’t win the pitch competition in the end, the event was a great opportunity to present their business model and attract attention to their product and the problem they are solving. 

For those who don’t know much about Matibabu yet: The 7-member team developed a machine to digitize the diagnosis of malaria. Patients put their finger into a portable device, which then uses light and magnetism to analyze the blood count for signs of a malaria infection. The whole diagnosis is done without drawing blood – it is completely non-invasive. The diagnosis software runs on the computer or smartphone, making it a fully portable diagnosis system. The accuracy of the diagnosis is around 80% at the moment, but the team wants to improve the device achieve accuracy to 90 to 95% in the future. By including outside parameters like the patient’s temperature too, the diagnosis process could be improved. The team is also developing the sensors of the device further. We are really proud about the further developments at Matibabu! Presenting in front of such an international and high-level audience was a really big #BigBangMoment after they had the chance to meet Bill Gates last year. 

 

 


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