Diabetes

Diabetes is a major cause of death[1] in developed countries, and the problem is getting worse.


A global problem

Diabetes arises when the body cannot produce enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or when the body produces insulin but cannot use it properly (type 2 diabetes).1 Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps the body to process the sugars in food.1 When the body cannot use or produce insulin, the blood sugars build up to levels which can lead to serious health issues.1 Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death,2 with an estimated 463 million people worldwide estimated to have diabetes.Of these 463 million people, around 90% have type 2 diabetes1. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) recognizes diabetes overall as one of the largest global health emergencies of the 21st century.1

The statistics about diabetes become very real when you consider that there was one death from diabetes every eight seconds in 2019,and most of these cases were type 2 diabetes.1 We can no longer ignore the need for effective interventions to combat this worldwide epidemic.

Type 2 diabetes is a family affair

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany is raising awareness about type 2 diabetes with its See it. Slow it. Stop it. campaign – with activity focusing on the IDF’s World Diabetes Day theme of ‘The Family and Diabetes’.

A person’s family can play a very important role in reducing their risk of acquiring or helping them to manage the lifestyle implications of living with type 2 diabetes. Through practical day-to-day support, giving motivation and encouragement, and by passing on knowledge, family involvement has been shown to positively impact a person’s chance of leading a healthier lifestyle.3,4

The See it. Slow it. Stop it. campaign is educating the public about the warning signs of type 2 diabetes and encouraging those at risk to make simple lifestyle changes, under the guidance of a healthcare professional, to steer them towards a healthier lifestyle in ways that involve the whole family.

See it. Slow it. Stop it – One Family’s Journey

We follow the lives of three generations of one family as they discover the challenges and options available once type 2 diabetes begins to affect their lives.

See it. Slow it. Stop it: The type 2 diabetes prevention guide

This World Diabetes Day (November 14, 2018), Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, is raising awareness about type 2 diabetes prevention with its See it. Slow it. Stop it. campaign. This global awareness campaign will educate the public about the warning signs of type 2 diabetes and encourage those at risk to see a healthcare professional to help get them on the right track. See it. Slow it. Stop it. offers tips to leading a healthier lifestyle that can involve all the family, linking with the IDF’s theme of “The Family and Diabetes”.

By 2040, 642 million are expected to develop diabetes, and most of these cases are expected to be type 2 diabetes.3 This means that many families are likely to be affected, so awareness of the signs, symptoms and risk factors is important to help detect it early and reduce an individual’s risk.4

The Family and Diabetes

The silent damage caused by high blood sugar

Early diagnosis can prevent or delay long-term health complications by maintaining blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels as close to normal as possible.1 Alternatively, poorly managed diabetes leads to serious complications and early death.1 There is therefore an urgent need to screen, diagnose, and provide appropriate care to people with diabetes.1

Prevention is vital, as type 2 diabetes can lead to:

  • Nerve damage, abnormal feelings or numbness1
  • Foot problems – like sores and infections1
  • Vision loss and blindness1
  • Miscarriage and stillbirth1
  • Kidney problems1
  • Increased risk of stroke5
  • Higher risk of a number of different types of cancer6

Type 2 diabetes can lead to long-term complications, including cardiovascular diseases.1 However, it may be possible for those at risk to prevent or delay the disease with certain lifestyle changes1 and by taking advice from a healthcare professional.  

The evidence

Landmark studies by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Research Group have shown that both lifestyle changes and medical intervention can reduce the incidence of diabetes in people at high risk for the disease,7 and these benefits have been confirmed in long-term studies over 10 and 15 years8,9

Other studies in Finland, USA, Japan, China, and India have shown the benefit of lifestyle changes in reducing the incidence of type 2 diabetes.10 The evidence shows that many cases of diabetes are related to lifestyle factors — physical activity, diet, smoking, alcohol, and obesity.11

Do you think you might be of risk for type 2 diabetes? Finding out is as easy as answering a few questions. Take a moment to take the test at www.yourprediabetes.info and find out if you are at risk. The first step is to take control! 

Where to find out more

To find out if you or a family member are at risk of type 2 diabetes and to learn more you can download the See it. Slow it. Stop it. - The Healthway Code brochure below. It includes important information about diabetes and tips on how to live a healthier lifestyle.

Where to find out more

To find out if you or a family member are at risk of type 2 diabetes and to learn more you can download the See it. Slow it. Stop it. - The Healthway Code brochure below. It includes important information about diabetes and tips on how to live a healthier lifestyle. 

If you are on social media you can follow our campaign via our channels on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook and engage in the global movement around World Diabetes Day.

Why are we doing this?

World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by IDF and World Health Organization to be a global driver to promote and raise awareness about diabetes. It is the largest diabetes campaign with a global audience of more than one billion people in more than 160 countries.12

Why are we doing this?

World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by IDF and World Health Organization to be a global driver to promote and raise awareness about diabetes. It is the largest diabetes campaign with a global audience of more than one billion people in more than 160 countries.12

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, and IDF signed a partnership agreement in November 2017 as we share the goal of promoting diabetes care and prevention worldwide, which is also why this campaign is important to us.

In connection to the World Diabetes Day, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany’s See it. Slow it. Stop it. campaign is aiming to support the larger objective of raising awareness about diabetes and demonstrates our commitment to improving the lives of people living with or at risk of the condition.

See it. Recognize the symptoms

Slow it. Make changes in your life and reduce the symptoms 

Stop it. Put a complete stop to being in the risk zone through a healthier lifestyle 

References

1 IDF (2017). IDF Atlas. 8th edition.

2 WHO. The top 10 causes of death. Available at: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/the-top-10-causes-of-death. Last accessed: September 2019.

3 Pamungkas, R.A., Chamroonsawasdi, K., Vatanasomboon, P. A. Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients. Behavioural Sciences. 2017. 7:62

4 Bennich, B.B. et al. Supportive and non-supportive interactions in families with a type 2 diabetes patient: an integrative review. Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome. 2017. 9:57

5 Diabetes.co.uk. Diabetes and stroke. Available at: https://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetescomplications/diabetes-and-stroke.html. Last accessed: July 2018.

6 Diabetes.co.uk. Diabetes and cancer. Available at: https://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetescomplications/diabetes-and-cancer.html. Last accessed: July 2018.

7 Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group. Reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin. N Engl J Med. 2002;346(6):393–403.

8 Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group. 10-year follow-up of diabetes incidence and weight loss in the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study. Lancet. 2009;374(9702):1677 86.

9 Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group. Long-term effects of lifestyle intervention or metformin on diabetes development and microvascular complications over 15-year follow-up: the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2015;3(11):866 75.

10 National NHS Diabetes initiative launched in major bid to prevent illness. Public Health England and NHS England. Press release; 12 March 2015. Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/national-nhs-diabetes-initiative-launched-in-major-bid-to-prevent-illness. Last accessed: September 2019.

11 Mozaffarian D, Kamineni A, Carnethon M, et al. Lifestyle Risk Factors and New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults. The Cardiovascular Health Study. 2009. Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(8):798–807.

12 IDF. World Diabetes Day. Available at: https://www.worlddiabetesday.org/about-wdd.html Last accessed October 2018.

 

 

 

 

Healthcare disclaimer

This section of our website includes information about certain topics related to the global healthcare business of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany.  For more specific information about the company’s healthcare business in the United States and Canada, please visit our EMD Serono website.

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